Apple cares a lot about privacy, so it’s introducing a new service that lets you sign into apps and services without relying on social networks that sell your data.

At its WWDC keynote on Monday, Apple introduced a new service called “Sign in with Apple,” which is a fast and secure way to sign into apps and websites.

The “Sign in with Apple” button will appear inside apps and websites in the same way you see “Sign in with Google” and “Sign in with Facebook” buttons. And it will similarly let you access new applications, websites and services without needing to create login information, like usernames and passwords, for each individual site.

But of course, the key selling point from Apple’s perspective is privacy.

“We always protect your identity and activity, and there’s no need to flip a switch to ask [us] to start respecting your privacy,” said Apple’s software chief Craig Federighi. “At Apple, we believe privacy is a fundamental human right, and we engineer it into everything we do.”

Third-party apps and services “can come at a cost to privacy,” Federighi said, since “personal information gets shared behind the scenes and can be used to track you.”

With “Sign in with Apple,” developers can put the button in their apps, and Apple can log you into any app with a new account without offering any of your personal information.

Some applications may want your name or email to send you information outside the app, and they’re allowed to request this information, but Apple built a solution for those privacy-minded folks: You can still choose to share your actual email address — or you can choose to hide it. If you want to hide your email address, Apple will create a random unique address that forwards to your real email address.

“We give each app a random address, so you can disable any one of them at any time when you’re tired of hearing from that app,” Federighi said.

“Sign in with Apple” will be available across all platforms and on the web. We expect it to come bundled with iOS 13 when it launches later this year.

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