Watching TED talk videos on loop when you are bored has become a thing of routine nowadays. These videos have a lot to keep you consumed for a good 45 minutes to 1 hour. They are captivating, informative and very much moralistic as the speaker goes on speaking about ideas which are worth sharing. In many of the cases, the speaker lets you dive down into their story by telling what were the life challenges he or she faced and how he or she successfully combated the battles and the worst time of their life.

It’s inspiring and motivating and has all the capacity in the world to transcend you into a whole new zone. You begin feeling fresh and focus on the brighter side of life. Without any doubt, TED talks have played a great role in inducing some great positive changes in my own life.

One such amazing and inspiring TED talk was delivered by Imran Khan, the former player who led our country to bag the World cup in 1992 and the very famous politician of this time. This guy definitely knows how to convey a compelling speech and deliver an extremely amazing message to the listeners.

Imran Khan’s TED talk is quite old now but the power it has to keep you talking about it has led me up this blog on it. You may disagree with him on his political views, plans and agendas and I do realize that he is a controversial figure in the political world right now, but the views and the vision that he has and the idea that he talked about in his TED talk back in 2011 is absolutely an inspiration.

His entire talk was encapsulated around the shell of the excerpt ‘Never give up on your dreams’.

Like every other influential person with a difficult past, his speech started with the stories of those difficult and troublesome times. He said that right at the beginning when he planned to join cricket and develop a career in it, he was met with a lot of hardships.

There was a time earlier in his career when he was dropped for 3 years. Three years, no cricket! Had he given up that moment, he wouldn’t be this successful to be eligible to give a TED TALK and have a pool of audience quietly listen as he goes on to speak about his life. It indeed is very inspiring as many of us drop our plans when we go through troubles at the initial stages of executing those plans. But being a man of will and determination, he was unstoppable.

I am absolutely a fan of his self-belief and the undying faith that he has in himself. And I truly believe that it is so important in life that one can literally grow from a seed to a tree with no water if he has belief in himself. Imran Khan once said about his self-belief that,

“I believed in myself. I never imagined myself as just an ordinary player”.

After his initial struggles, he told the audience about the brutally failed match of his career. He talked about a match in India where the green shirts were crumbled mercilessly and when they got back to Pakistan, they had to hide in their houses ‘because the fans were very angry’. This incident too could not drop a brick from his wall of fortitude.

Because he believes and has quoted on a number of occasions that,

“It is not the defeat that destroys you, it is being demoralized by the defeat that destroys you”.

While talking about the start of his career, he mentioned that his inspiration came from the Australian bowler Dennis Lillee who was regarded as the ‘outstanding fast bowler of his generation’. And it was him that Imran Khan wanted to become like but the coaches said that he didn’t have it in him. Didn’t have it in him? The guy who captained the winning team in 1992 with his superb bowling and captaincy skills didn’t have it in him? It was probably these incidences that made Imran Khan what he is today.

He said all he ever dreamt was to become a fine successful player. In his own words,

“I wanted to be an outstanding player; that was my dream”.

The rest of his speech was about the cricket talent in Pakistan and a little mention of his political achievements. He also mentioned the struggles he had to deal with to establish the first free hospital for the treatment of cancer in Pakistan, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Hospital. His constant efforts and desire to cut down the death tolls by cancer in Pakistan is indeed appraisable.

By having a look at all the points that he, directly and indirectly, delivered I got to learn that there is one question which you should ask yourself when in times of hopelessness and complete trouble. You should ask yourself how your decision at that point in time will affect your future self.

Now if Imran Khan had completely stopped working hard after being dropped and being told that ‘he didn’t have it in him’ would he ever become such a successful cricketer?

If we even look at his political career, he indeed HAS achieved a lot. But let’s not get into that.

It is one’s own hard work, persistence, and degree of desire that lead him to the point where he wants to be.

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